Battlestar Galactica ★★★★

Social deduction games, in which traitors try to subvert a group, tend to be very short. A match of The Resistance, Among Us or Werewolf can be completed in less than half an hour. The average game in the genre is a light affair, as easily played as put away in storage.

Battlestar Galactica, however, isn’t. It’s a serious game, taking two to three hours to play. Its length, seriousness and complexity make it stand out and make it one of the best titles in its field.

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Tragedy Looper: Why set Table Talk to “off”

Like many deduction games, Tragedy Looper is enhanced by placing restrictions on communication. The manual recommends limiting the Protagonists’ ability to talk with each other to the small frame between time loops, forcing them to play without the full knowledge of each other’s actions.

This optional rule, thematically called the “Table Talk Off” setting, makes the already great Tragedy Looper even better. In this article, I’ll explain how it improves the player’s experience and why implement it in your game.

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The Crew: The Quest for Planet Nine ★★★

Trick-taking, the last frontier. For all my gaming experience, nothing remains as intimidating as four grandpas playing Bridge or Hearts. Hidden behind simple rules and a familiar façade there’s an amount of trickery and depth I’ve never been fully able to understand.

The Crew: The Quest for Planet Nine, a cooperative take on the genre, has made me see the possibilities for the first time and all while having fun.

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Hanabi: Grands Feux ★★★

Hanabi Grands Feux Cover

Hanabi is a cooperative deduction game in which you can see the cards held by your teammates, but not your own. Limited to small clues as your only form of communication, it’s a challenging exercise in contextual logic.

Grands Feux, the newest edition, brings us the best version of the game yet and three great expansions. Let’s have a look.

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